Posts tagged digital africa

We’ve quickly put together this summary edit for International Women’s Day. It explains why combining radio and ICTs is so important and how rural women struggle with mobile phone access.

As part of Fieldcraft’s Project Tanzania we spent the afternoon with Bart Sullivan, ICT and radio specialist with Farm Radio International, in Arusha Tanzania.

Farm Radio International is a Canadian charity working with over 400 radio broadcasters in 38 African countries to fight poverty and food insecurity.

Find out more about Farm Radio International http://www.farmradio.org


Follow Fieldcraft on twitter: @Field_craft


As part of Fieldcraft’s Project Tanzania we spent the afternoon with Bart Sullivan, ICT and radio specialist with Farm Radio International, in Arusha Tanzania.

Farm Radio International is a Canadian charity working with over 400 radio broadcasters in 38 African countries to fight poverty and food insecurity.

The short film features some highlights from our chat.

Find out more about Farm Radio International http://www.farmradio.org


Follow Fieldcraft on twitter: @Field_craft

Brilliant video showing minutes of talk time per one litre of cooking oil. The idea is to show the cost of talk time in relation to an everyday commodity.

In Tanzania your ‘shopping’ list would look like this:

For the price of one kilo of cooking oil you would get 24.92 phone minutes.

For the price of one kilo of sugar you would get 10.18 phone minutes.

For the price of one kilo of tea you would get 7.71 phone minutes.

Tanzania has the fourth cheapest mobile tariffs in Africa.

Tech 4 change

First Mile project from @IFADNews-farmers use mobiles to get market price info.

Brilliant resource of data and info on #ICT in #Africa - http://www.oafrica.com @oafrica

Brilliant resource of data and info on #ICT in #Africa - http://www.oafrica.com @oafrica

Is #Africa broadband ready?

Interactive #Infographic from @BBCNews on broadband penetration in #Africa. #ICT

Touch down in Tanzania

We’ve finally arrived in Tanzania.

Afer the snow and freezing conditions in the UK it was a welcome change to step off the plane into the Tanzanian sunshine.

We’re here to research how open data, innovative ICTs and mobile and SMS collide and can be used for compelling storytelling and local and global advocacy.

Read all about what we are doing here on our Project Tanzania page. We’re making last minute preparations before we head off on our journey which will take us from the capital of Dar es Salaam to rural Tanzania.

We’ll be telling the story of who we meet along the way. So stay tuned to our Tumblr, and follow us on Twitter (@LizScarff and @dcfieldcraft)

Project Tanzania

Where do storytelling, SMS and open source technology, social networks and advocacy collide?

Stories are how we learn about what is happening in our world. They inform how we think, learn and adapt. They’re how we justify our decisions or teach our children.

They’re how we share our indignation and persuade and inspire others to join our cause.

Technology, open data and social media have turned storytelling upside down - sideways - every which way but the way that we knew.

Social media gave the Arab Spring activists the tools to quickly organise, share information and bring about change. And access to data has driven global stories like Wikileaks.

But while Facebook and Twitter may have grabbed the headlines in the Middle East and Maghreb there is another digital revolution taking place in Africa.

Lack of a ‘fixed line’ telecoms infrastructure has dictated that the continent ‘leapfrog’ technology straight to mobile. And Africa has one of the world’s fastest growing mobile markets with subscribers expected to reach 750 million by the end of 2012.

 The country is fast becoming the envy of the world with its ability to innovate. Mobile phones bring access to health, social networks and entertainment.  One of the most visible innovations being Kenya’s mobile payment system M-Pesa.

But technology doesn’t tell stories or hold governments to account - people do.

So what would happen if you joined this new vanguard of storytellers, bloggers, hacktavists, citizen journalists (really anybody with a mobile phone or computer) with the new tools, with greater mobile penetration, innovative partnership, open data and open source tools, and mashed them up on the new frontier of storytelling – of hyperlocal advocacy?

That’s what we are in Tanzania to find out.

We’re on the ground meeting people and organisations that are working on ground-breaking projects. From people who are working to combine radio (which has the highest penetration) with open source programs like Freedom Fone to inspired individuals setting up rural ICT projects to organisations using SMS to hold local government to account.

We’ve also partnered with Tweetminster who are going to be running a report for us on the use and penetration of Twitter in Tanzania.